Use Classes to Enhance List and Combo Boxes

Access 97, 2003 and 2007 has support for standard class modules lets you greatly extend the functionality of standard controls. In this article, Jim shows you how to make Access unbound list and combo boxes behave more like those in Visual Basic by adding a few new methods and properties via a standard class module.

VISUAL Basic 4.0 added a new module type known as a class module. Class modules are distinct from standard modules in that they can be used as templates to create, or instantiate, objects. These objects can have their own data, and have their own functions, or methods. They allow for a style of programming known as Object-Oriented Programming, or OOP. Continue reading

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Tricks With Combo Boxes

This month, Doug Steele show you how to manipulate a ComboBox to display multiple fields and how to synchronize one Combo box with another.

My ComboBox displays multiple fields in it when I’ve got it dropped down, but once I select a value, it only displays a single field. Is there any way I can see the other fields once I’ve made a selection?

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Let me check my list …

Doug tries to address commonly asked questions from Access developers. This month, he looks at various ways of using the List Box control including Multi-Select, moving items between lists, using non table record sources and showing all tables in a database in a list box .

I’ve got a list box that I’m using as a means of limiting what’s reported. It works fine when the list box doesn’t allow Multi Select. However, I’d like to be able to select more than one object at a time from the list box.

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How can I change the size of the checkbox on my form

This month, Doug Steele looks at how to have larger checkboxes and how to deal with code that gets unlinked from the control to which it’s supposed to be linked.

How can I change the size of the checkbox on my form?

Unfortunately, you can’t. What you can do, though, is simulate a larger checkbox. The first step is to put a checkbox on the form, as you would normally, and set its Visible property to False/No (for the discussion that follows, I’m going to assume that this hidden checkbox is named chkHidden). The second step is to put an unbounded label on the form where you want the larger checkbox. Set the properties of the label to the entries in Table 1 (I’m going to assume that the label you just added is named lblUnboundCheckbox). Continue reading

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Handling groups of controls

This month in Access Answers, Doug Steele gathers together several questions around handling groups of controls to provide alternative solutions to a common problem.

I have a number of controls on my form that I need to be able to make visible or not depending on what’s happening in the program logic. Is there an easier way than having a whole series of VBA statements, one per control? Continue reading

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